Tag Archives: eggs

Egg Muffins and Lifestyle changes (A 4 hour body recipe)

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google
  • StumbleUpon

Today I end my love affair with sugar.

Let me back up a bit. It actually ended about 2 months ago after a brief phone call with my doctor in which he told me, “You have the liver of an alcoholic”. You could say I was a bit devastated. I should have known that after a lifetime of poor diet choices that it would lead to something but I never thought it would be my liver. This is a potentially serious condition that, at this point, is completely reversible. The time to act is now.

A few months before, I had started reading The 4-Hour Body by Timothy Ferriss. I had quickly lost interest before I even got to the diet part of the book, which was like chapter 3. (Yeah, I lose interest that quick—I blame the ADD.) After I got the news, I picked the book back up immediately and reread the entire diet section. I skipped the sex machine part of the book, for obvious reasons ;)

After reading that book, I jumped over to a recommendation from a 4HB friend called Why We Get Fat and What To Do About It by Gary Taubes. This is the definitive book on why carbs, specifically simple carbs like sugar and starch are so bad for our bodies. But it’s even more specific on why fat and protein are NOT bad for you, even in large amounts. I say fat first, because realistically, when looking at the calorie to gram ratio, fat is more than twice as large.

I now follow the 4HB diet as a lifestyle change, not as a diet. I make a point to pack in protein and complex carbs from beans and lentils into every meal. But more importantly, my fat content, especially the fat content from animal fat, is even higher than it ever was. I don’t go out of my way to find animal fat, I’m just not as scared of it any more.

That said, my girlfriend is a vegetarian, which means no animal fat for her. The protein sources are limited when you factor out the occasional soy product, which really isn’t good for anyone, let alone women. I think coping with that, has made life a little more difficult for her. Even more difficult is packing in 30 grams of protein a day for breakfast. I doubt either of us came anywhere near that in the morning. For her busy full time schedule, it makes it even more challenging so I’ve developed a recipe to make it a little easier on her, which is below.

I don’t want to make a huge deal out this change and the science behind it, but as I’m sure everyone I’ve come into contact with over the last two months can attest to, I do make it a bit of the centerpiece of my social life. I apologize for that. Instead I’m going to try to interject it into this blog, which will effectively change the format for the future. Ok, so maybe it’s kind of a big deal for those of you who came to this blog to see extremely beautiful but crazily unhealthy foods. The lack of sugar and starch can be a bit humdrum, I know. Unfortunately no matter how you slice it fruit is sugar, dairy is sugar, and alcohol is sugar. But fear not…

Did I mention that once a week we eat whatever the hell we want? Since we don’t want to bring the crap foods into our kitchen anymore we mostly eat those meals out, which will become the focus to the naughtier parts of this blog, the fun and crazy stuff. This diet, in its simplest form, is kind of boring, I have to admit. It calls for consuming large amounts of protein, vegetables and lentils or beans. That, in itself, is very easy to do but after time can get boring. Reverend Ferriss (as I’ve come to lovingly call him) is all about the boring for the sake of ease. “Are you really going to go through major prep for every meal?” For most people, the answer is no. But for people like me, who are already there, the answer is resoundingly, “Yes.” So if you find yourself on a low/slow/no carb diet or just want to try something new and healthy, this blog might just be for you.

Believe it or not, I actually had a TL:DR version of this blog post, one that reflected most of the points of the diet. I decided it would be better to slowly reveal that information and tie it into the subject of each blog post. That is where we start with this recipe – one of many 4 hour body recipes that will be featured on this site. It’s one of the rules of the diet — 30 grams of protein within 30 minutes of waking up.


Egg Muffins

Egg Muffins
Makes: 12 protein rich muffins
Serving size: 3 muffins
Protein: +/- 30 grams
Fat: Who cares? (I’ll explain this at another time)

12 Eggs
4 cups of spinach, finely chopped, then wilted
3 cups of lentils, cooked
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp pepper
2 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray a cupcake tray with nonstick spray or grease with oil. Add eggs to a large bowl, mix with a whisk, then add spinach, lentils, and spices. Using a half cup measure, pour mixture into cupcake tins. I like to additionally mix it around with the measuring cup before scooping and pouring as the lentils tend to sink to the bottom. It’s important to keep a good mix of egg and lentils. Bake for 18-20 minutes or until completely set in the center. Remove from oven, let cool. This is important for having a clean pan when you take them out of the tray. If you try to remove them still hot, they will crumble. As the cool they shrink enough that they pop out with ease, leaving nothing behind, as long as you’ve coated the pan with enough oil. Enjoy

I’ve also recently played around with different protein sources other than lentils. I did chickpeas and black beans recently and I found that I actually loved them more than the lentils. But the lentils are smaller and denser so you can pack in more protein per square inch. When you are eating these every day for breakfast, it’s best to mix it up every once in a while.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google
  • StumbleUpon

Fun with Color and Texture – Natural Dye Easter Eggs

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google
  • StumbleUpon

Fun with Color and Texture - Natural Dye Easter Eggs

Easter Eggs have seriously never been so cool until now. I used to decorate these little guys as a kid and got bored with stickers and crayons and such. But then I discovered making my own natural dyes which gives each egg its own earthy randomness. The process is simple, chop or shred veg and fruit (the ones that usually bleed color) and add it to a pot – red cabbage, beets, spinach, carrots, onion skins, etc. Add a couple of tablespoons of vinegar and water to top off. Throw in the eggs and boil. Reduce heat to simmer for about 30 minutes, reducing the liquid dye. Sift with a fine mesh sieve into a jar and now you have dye which you can add up to 4 cups of water to if needed.

Fun with Color and Texture - Natural Dye Easter Eggs

If you want less randomness and more uniform, solid colors, boil the eggs first by themselves then add to pre made dye. Here are some of the ingredients I used:


Fun with Color and Texture - Natural Dye Easter Eggs

Fun with Color and Texture - Natural Dye Easter Eggs

Fun with Color and Texture - Natural Dye Easter Eggs

Fun with Color and Texture - Natural Dye Easter Eggs

Fun with Color and Texture - Natural Dye Easter Eggs

Fun with Color and Texture - Natural Dye Easter Eggs

Aside from cooking the eggs with the ingredients, you can also make sure some of the sediment makes it into the jar which will help create more random looks. For example, the spinach didn’t yield great results on the boil. But putting the egg in the spinach dye overnight, got me a very cool earthy color and texture. The following are the results I got with the dyes. I’ll explain the process of each one under each image.


Fun with Color and Texture - Natural Dye Easter Eggs
Beets – This is fairly uniform, although my bowl was shallow so one side got darker than the other. It would have been best just to dip the egg in a full jar.

Fun with Color and Texture - Natural Dye Easter Eggs
Tumeric with a pinch of saffron – the egg cracked which gave it even more texture. This is one of my favorites!

Fun with Color and Texture - Natural Dye Easter Eggs
Yellow Onion Skins – boiled in pot with skins. Love the textures

Fun with Color and Texture - Natural Dye Easter Eggs
Spinach – soaked overnight in dye and sediment

Fun with Color and Texture - Natural Dye Easter Eggs
Blueberry – yeah, kind of gray. Boiled in blueberries to give it the textures. If you soak it overnight, you’ll have more of a blueish gray.

Fun with Color and Texture - Natural Dye Easter Eggs
Red Cabbage – This is my absolute favorite. You’d think it would be red or purple but red cabbage yields blue tones. Boiled with the cabbage it produces a trippy patterns.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google
  • StumbleUpon

Cooking like Heston: Scotch Eggs

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google
  • StumbleUpon

Scotch EggsI’ve been inspired by a new British series, How to Cook Like Heston. Each episode focuses on a key ingredient: Beef, Eggs, Chocolate, etc done by Heston Blumenthal, chef/owner of the 3-Michelin star Fat Duck in London. This latest episode I saw was all about eggs, so i’ve done his scotch eggs. Later this week I’m hoping to do a few other egg dishes, but for now, I give you Heston’s scotch eggs – soft boiled eggs, wrapped in sausage and coated with bread crumb – which as you will note by the photograph, still have a somewhat runny yolk. Hard to imagine for an egg that has been boiled, deep-fried and then baked. The key is cooking at the right temperature. You soft boil the egg by getting the egg and water right to boiling, cover the pot and let sit for 3 minutes, then stop the cooking with an ice bath. Deep fry at 190c(375F) until just golden brown and then bake for 10 minutes at 190c(375F). My yolk is a little hard, which I think must have happened in the boiling process considering that the other two temperatures were spot on.

Heston’s recipe can be found here. I’ve reprinted it below with the conversions (damn metric system!!)


Scotch Eggs

Scotch Eggs

Scotch Eggs

Scotch Eggs

Scotch Eggs

Scotch Eggs

Scotch Eggs


Scotch Eggs
Serves 8

INGREDIENTS
10 medium eggs
450g (1lb) good-quality sausages, skins removed
½ tsp smoked paprika
2 tsp cornflour
45g (3/8 cup) French’s mustard
Salt and black pepper
Plain flour
50g (1/4 cup) whole milk
125g (5/8 cup) breadcrumbs (If you use coarse breadcrumbs, blitz them in a food processor for approximately 5 seconds to create a coarse powder so the crumbs don’t absorb too much fat during frying.)
Groundnut oil, for deep-frying
Method

Preheat the oven to 190ºC/gas mark 5 (375F). Put 8 of the eggs into a pan in which they fit in a single layer. Add enough cold water to cover the eggs by 3cm and cover with a lid then place the pan over a high heat.

Once the water comes to a boil, remove the pan from the heat and allow to stand for 3 minutes. In the meantime, fill a bowl with ice and cold water and after the 3 minutes, transfer the eggs to the iced water. Leave to cool for 10–15 minutes.

Place the sausage meat in a food processor with the smoked paprika, cornflour, mustard, and a splash of cold water. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper and blitz together. Divide into eight balls, approximately 55g (about 3tbsp) per portion.

Once the eggs are cool enough to handle, carefully peel off the shells using a teaspoon.

Flatten each portion of sausage meat between two sheets of clingfilm into a circle, then remove the top layer of clingfilm. Place an egg in the centre of each sausage meat circle. Wrap the sausage meat around the egg, by bringing all of the edges together and twist the top of the clingfilm. Press the edges to seal but don’t press too hard. Place in the fridge for 20 minutes.

In the meantime, put some plain flour into a small bowl and season it with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Beat the remaining eggs in a second small bowl and stir in the milk. Put the breadcrumbs into a third bowl. Roll each coated egg in the flour, gently tapping off any excess, then dip it in the beaten egg. Finally, roll it in the breadcrumbs, making sure that all sides are coated. Place the eggs in the fridge for 15 minutes.

Heat a deep fat fryer to 190ºC (375F) or place a deep saucepan of oil over a high heat until it reaches this temperature.

Fry the Scotch eggs two at a time for 2 minutes until golden brown. Remove from the oil with a slotted spoon and place on a cooling rack over a baking tray. When all the eggs have been fried, place the tray in the oven for an additional 10 minutes. Serve immediately while the yolks are still runny

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google
  • StumbleUpon

Great Boston Brunch – Mike & Patty’s and Island Creek Oyster Bar

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google
  • StumbleUpon

Brunch isn’t just a NYC thing although we do it the best out of anyone. However, if you are in Boston, there are two great place to try. The first is Mike & Patty’s, a tiny (even by NYC standards) cafe and breakfast nook in Bay Village. You’ll be hard pressed to find a table (there is only one) but its mostly a takeout joint with some amazing food. Their speciality is the Fancy Sandwich (sorry, no picture). I went for the Croque Madame. I am always a sucker for Croque.

The next place is Island Creek Oyster Bar near the Boston University Campus. In a city where seafood reigns, this stylish and modern restaurant does amazing things with raw shellfish. I could have eaten a dozen or two.

Mike & Patty’s
12 Church St
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 423-3447

Island Creek Oyster Bar
500 Commonwealth Ave
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 532-5300

Mike & Patty's - Boston, Ma

Mike & Patty's - Boston, Ma
Croque Madame at Mike & Patty’s

Island Creek Oyster Bar - Boston, Ma
1/2 dozen Oysters at Island Creek Oyster Bar

Island Creek Oyster Bar - Boston, Ma
Oyster at Island Creek Oyster Bar

Island Creek Oyster Bar - Boston, Ma

Island Creek Oyster Bar - Boston, Ma

Island Creek Oyster Bar - Boston, Ma

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google
  • StumbleUpon

home/made: Red Hook, Brooklyn, NYC

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google
  • StumbleUpon

We have a bit of a peeve about brunch. It’s a bit overrated and so popular right now that we go to the supposed hot, new places and have to wait for 1+ hours for a table only to find the meal mediocre at best. home/made, in Red Hook, is an exception to that rule. They focus on a few small things and do a great job. The espresso and coffee are wonderful, the scrambles are inventive and delightful and the potatoes with whole roasted garlic; Oh my, the potatoes are phenomenal. In addition to their indoor dining area they also have a small shaded and sun-drenched garden. The prices are reasonable and the waitstaff does not have a stick up their ass either. Enjoy!

home/made
293 Van Brunt Street
Brooklyn, NY 11231
(347) 223-4135

home/made - Red Hook, Brooklyn, NYC

home/made - Red Hook, Brooklyn, NYC
frothy cappuccino

home/made - Red Hook, Brooklyn, NYC
Pecan Sticky Bun

home/made - Red Hook, Brooklyn, NYC
roasted tomatoes, arugula & fontina scramble

home/made - Red Hook, Brooklyn, NYC
double smoked bacon

home/made - Red Hook, Brooklyn, NYC
Ramps and Goat Cheese Scramble

Related Posts with Thumbnails
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google
  • StumbleUpon